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NZ crashed to a seven-wicket loss to Australia in the World Cup final, ending a memorable campaign in disappointing fashion.

  • 'Co-pilot's personality not the only lead'

    Andreas Lubitz father told the mayor of Prads-Haute-Bléone, a town located close to the crash site, that he carried the weight of the world on his shoulders. Mayor Bernard Bartolini, who met the father at a local vigil held for victims, told French media that the father was a broken man. Meanwhile, investigators say the personality is a "serious lead" in the inquiry but not the only one.

    AFP
  • Windows 7 Laptops . Amazing Bargains

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  • Elton John 'will keep paying his mother's bills'

    Sir Elton John will keep paying his mother's bills despite their ongoing feud. Sheila ­Farebrother, 90, and her son have not spoken in seven years, and although Sir Elton is deeply upset at his mother for recently accusing the singer of saying he "hated" her, he has no intention of stopping the financial support he provides. A friend explained to the Sunday Mirror newspaper: "He is upset and cross, but people should remember that Elton pays all of her bills and that won't stop.

    Bang Showbiz
  • Ryan Phillippe's daughter embarrassed

    Ryan Phillippe's daughter gets embarrassed when people think he is her brother. The 40-year-old actor - who has 15-year-old Ava with his former spouse Reese Witherspoon - has admitted he regularly gets mistaken for being much younger than he is. Meanwhile, Ryan - who also has Deacon, 10, from his marriage to the 'Wild' star and two-year-old daughter Kai with former girlfriend Alexis Knapp - previously admitted he felt as though his "greatest achievement" was becoming a father.

    Bang Showbiz
  • Boko Haram fighters told to 'kill wives' as troops take its 'HQ'

    Nigeria's military on Friday announced that troops had retaken the town of Gwoza from Boko Haram, from which the group declared their caliphate last year. Defence spokesman Chris Olukolade told a news conference in the capital, Abuja, that the recapture came after "concerted and well-coordinated land and air operations". "A lot of arms and ammunition have been recovered and the administrative headquarters (of Boko Haram) completely destroyed," he said.

    AFP
  • Saudi blogger Badawi views survival of 50 lashes as miracle - magazine

    Jailed Saudi blogger Raif Badawi has described in his first public remarks from prison how he "miraculously survived 50 lashes" as part of a conviction that sparked an international outcry, the German weekly Der Spiegel reported on Saturday. Badawi was arrested in 2012 for offences including insulting Islam, cyber crime and disobeying his father, which is a crime in Saudi Arabia. In his remarks, Badawi recalled how he received the first round of lashes in January while surrounded by a cheering crowd that chanted "Allahu akbar" (God is greatest), Der Spiegel said.

    Reuters
  • America's Cup future in doubt for Team NZ

    Team New Zealand's future in the America's Cup is doubtful if Auckland misses out on a qualifying regatta in early 2017. The America's Cup website said competitors and organisers of the 2017 event were planning to implement rule changes which would "dramatically" reduce costs, primarily by racing in a smaller boat. This would mean the challenger regatta in early 2017 would not be awarded to Auckland.

    NZ Newswire
  • JetBlue pilot who yelled during flight sues airline for $16M

    A JetBlue Airways pilot who scared passengers by yelling about Jesus and al-Qaida during a 2012 trip from New York to Las Vegas sued the airline for more than $16 million Friday, saying it jeopardized the flight by failing to recognize he was ill. Clayton Osbon's lawsuit in Manhattan federal court was filed exactly three years after his March 27, 2012, flight, hours before the statute of limitations would have expired. The lawsuit said Osbon, 52, was a flight standards captain who primarily flew Airbus planes and helped JetBlue develop and maintain safety procedures before he suffered a seizure traced to the effects of a childhood traumatic head injury that damaged his brain.

    Associated Press
  • Japan whaling ships return home from Antarctic with no catch

    Japanese whaling ships returned home from the Antarctic on Saturday for the first time in nearly 30 years with no catch onboard, after a UN court ordered an end to their annual hunt, local media reported. It was the first return by Japanese whalers without catching any whales since 1987 when the country began the annual "research" hunt in the Antarctic, the Asahi Shimbun said. Tokyo had said this season's excursion would not involve any lethal hunting.

    AFP
  • Hulk: Wrestlemania 1,000 bigger than Super Bowl!

    More than 70,000 fans are expected to fill Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California, this weekend and maybe a million more will tune in on TV for the WWE (WWE)'s biggest event of the year-Wrestlemania. Hulk Hogan, arguably the sports most recognizable name, told CNBC the industry he helped build is faring better than ever. There's big business behind WWE's flagship event that Hogan says is like "the Super Bowl, but times 1,000." Last year, more than a million people paid to access WWE's Wrestlemania via pay-per-view and the WWE's new digital network.

    CNBC
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  • Technology to look inside Fukushima reactors faces challenge

    The cutting-edge technology was billed as a way to decipher where exactly the morass of nuclear fuel might sit at the bottom of reactors in the Japanese power plant that went into multiple meltdowns four years ago. Muons are cosmic-ray subatomic particles so tiny they go through almost anything except for so-called heavy elements like uranium and plutonium used for nuclear fuel.

    Associated Press
  • German airline could face 'unlimited' damages for Alps crash

    Lufthansa could face "unlimited" compensation claims for the crash that killed 150 people in the French alps and it would be difficult, even counterproductive, for the German carrier to try to avoid liability, experts said Friday. To avoid liability, a carrier has to prove that the crash wasn't due to "negligence or other wrongful act" by its employees, according to Article 21 of the 1999 Montreal Convention. Germanwings is a subsidiary of Lufthansa.

    Associated Press
  • American tourist recalls horror NZ crash

    An American tourist who caused a car accident that killed his wife and two close friends has spoken about how he didn't see a truck because he was focused on making a turn. Richard Barnett, 56, earlier pleaded guilty at the Hamilton District Court to three charges of careless driving causing death and was fined and disqualified from driving in New Zealand for the next year. Barnett told TVNZ's Sunday programme he had 40 years of driving experience on the right hand side of the road but just two days of driving on the left.

    NZ Newswire
  • Rome pensioner given $16 mn Picasso 'for act of kindness'

    Italian police are trying to establish the true owner of a Picasso painting worth 15 million euros ($16 million) after confiscating it from a pensioner who says he was given it for free. The Rome resident, a former frame-maker, told detectives he received the work in 1978 as a thank you gift for an act of kindness towards a recently bereaved customer. Two days later, the elderly customer returned to the workshop and presented him with the Picasso, without giving any indication of its value or artistic significance.

    AFP
  • Russian military TV station offers job to Jeremy Clarkson

    A television station owned by the Russian defense ministry is offering a job to former "Top Gear" host Jeremy Clarkson. The Zvezda TV channel published a letter to Clarkson on its website late Thursday, inviting him to visit Moscow in April and discuss launching a car show in Russia. The Guinness Book of World Records has described "Top Gear" as the world's most widely watched factual program.

    Associated Press
  • Mental health vetting of pilots ineffective, US experts say

    There is little effective, real-world screening of airline pilots for mental problems despite regulations in the U.S., Europe and elsewhere that say mental health should be part of their regular medical exams, pilots and safety experts said. The crash of Germanwings Flight 9525 into an Alpine mountain, which killed all 150 people aboard, has raised questions about the mental state of the co-pilot. In the U.S., the Federal Aviation Administration requires that pilots receive a physical exam from a flight surgeon annually or every six months depending upon the pilot's age.

    Associated Press
  • US bond yields rise slightly on Yellen remarks

    U.S. sovereign yields rose slightly on Friday after Fed Chair Janet Yellen said a rate increase "may be warranted" this year. Yields on benchmark 10-year Treasury (U.S.: US10Y)-used to calculate mortgage rates and other consumer loans-closed at 1.9625 percent after falling to session-lows of 1.9499. Thirty-year bond yields also ticked up after Yellen's statement to 2.5360 from 2.5303.

    CNBC
  • Deaths of hospital CEO and wife in fire ruled murder-suicide

    A hospital executive who spent decades as an important figure in New Jersey politics and policy killed his wife, set their house ablaze, then killed himself, a prosecutor ruled Friday, finally giving an explanation six months later of the mysterious deaths. The four grown sons of John and Joyce Sheridan released a statement expressing doubt about the findings released by Somerset County Prosecutor Geoffrey Soriano. The sons, including Mark Sheridan, a prominent Republican election law lawyer, said they would be suing under a New Jersey statute that allows next of kin to challenge findings on death certificates.

    Associated Press
  • Internet outages reveal gaps in US broadband infrastructure

    When vandals sliced a fiber-optic cable in the Arizona desert last month, they did more than time-warp thousands of people back to an era before computers, credit cards or even phones. Because Internet service is largely unregulated by the federal government and the states, decisions about network reliability are left to the service providers. The result: While most major metropolitan areas in the U.S. have backup systems, some smaller cities and many rural areas do not.

    Associated Press
  • Want to know where the dollar's headed? Watch this

    The dollar's recent weakness has been directly tied to the market's view that the Fed will take a longer time to raise interest rates, and that perhaps September is a more likely launching point than June, as some investors had expected. If we get an as expected, 250,000 number, June is still possible," said Alan Ruskin, head of G-10 currency foreign exchange strategy at Deutsche Bank. It gained on improvements in the economy but also on the fact that the U.S. was heading for a higher interest rates while other central banks were maintaining easier policies.

    CNBC
  • Roger Daltrey: John's death brought Pete and I closer together

    Roger Daltrey says the prospect of death has brought him closer to Pete Townshend. The iconic The Who members were shaken when fellow band member John Entwistle passed away at the age of 57 in 2002, and Roger explained the shock of his death made them appreciate each other and put their differences behind them. The 71-year-old rocker - who is currently gearing up for several months of touring across North America and Europe - continued to say John's death made them consider the short amount of time they have left to live, which encouraged them to head out on the road.

    Bang Showbiz